About the Books

Blood and War at my Doorstep: North Carolina Civilians in the War Between the States Volume I

In Blood and War at my Doorstep: North Carolina Civilians in the War Between the States, readers will learn that North Carolina citizens did not idly stand by as their soldiers marched off to war. The women worked themselves into “patriotic exhaustion” through Aid Societies. Civilians with different means of support from the lower class to the plantation mistress wrote the governor complaining of hoarding, speculation, the tithe, bushwhackers, unionism, conscription, and exemptions. Never before had so many died due to guerilla warfare. Unknown before starving women with weapons stormed the merchant or warehouses in search for food. Others turned to smuggling, spying, or nature’s oldest profession. Filling within the pages of this book are information from period newspapers, as well as mostly unpublished letters, tell their stories.

 

Blood and War at my Doorstep: North Carolina Civilians in the War Between the States Volume II

Blood and War at my Doorstep: North Carolina Civilians in the War Between the States Volume II follows exactly where the first book has left off, so you can smoothly continue tracing North Carolina’s history and witness the civilians’ story unravel.  

This book is a continuation of Volume I.  It contains 190 pages of soldiers’ letters, mostly unpublished.  Read in their own words how some slaves were treated.  Did any join the military as soldiers?

Wilmington, our largest city, burst with scandalous persons, yellow fever, and blockade-running stories. Rose O’Neal Greenhow’s body washed up near Ft. Fisher with a belt of gold coins and cipher codes within her clothing.

The book would not be complete without stories of Sherman’s march and Stoneman’s western raid.  Many civilians were killed in spite of orders to spare the citizens from plunder. Federal soldiers, surprised at the obstinate females they encountered, told of their bravery and pluck.

The end of the war could not come soon enough for those at home.  War weary folks, some near starvation, had no where to flee from the enemy.  Like waves on a pond, the end came to Ft. Fisher, then the interior as soldiers retreated.  Paroled soldiers’ views are expressed as well as a Quaker couple’s campaign to assist the down-trodden in the eastern part of the state and piedmont. Both Volume I and Volume II cover stories from each of the state’s 87 counties at the time.